Boiling bait...or not?

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cookiesdaughtersdad
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Boiling bait...or not?

Post by cookiesdaughtersdad » Sun May 06 2018 10:23

I use the typical pigeon food as a particle for the river carp only my burco has a terminal illness, all the bait is soaking and I'm going on holiday before I can get another, my mate " Mad Martin" :dizzy: recons that uncooked seeds (although fully soaked) is bad for the fish, I think he is wrong but what do you think???

Cheers ALan
"Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity" Seneca, some Roman chap.

Fish on....
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Re: Boiling bait...or not?

Post by Fish on.... » Sun May 06 2018 10:32

Some particles can be bad for the fish if not cooked I believe, but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding. In America they use a lot of maize and they just soak that for weeks at a time, they never boil it.

A fish doesn’t have a very complicated digestive system, I saw a fish doctor say it’s like a long bag where what goes in the mouth effectively pushes out what’s at the other end of the stomach so nothing sits there for very long. Hence why you see your bait on the mat sometimes I guess.
Actually know as Danny..

cookiesdaughtersdad
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Re: Boiling bait...or not?

Post by cookiesdaughtersdad » Sun May 06 2018 10:48

Fish on.... wrote:
Some particles can be bad for the fish if not cooked I believe, but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding. In America they use a lot of maize and they just soak that for weeks at a time, they never boil it.

A fish doesn’t have a very complicated digestive system, I saw a fish doctor say it’s like a long bag where what goes in the mouth effectively pushes out what’s at the other end of the stomach so nothing sits there for very long. Hence why you see your bait on the mat sometimes I guess.
"but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding."

I agree with that, you can see the starch oozing out of the split seeds, then after a few days, the smell of the active bait is obvious particularly if you add molasses but I catch enough bream anyway :laughs:

Cheers ALan
"Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity" Seneca, some Roman chap.

Kev Berry
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Re: Boiling bait...or not?

Post by Kev Berry » Sun May 06 2018 11:10

cookiesdaughtersdad wrote:
Fish on.... wrote:
Some particles can be bad for the fish if not cooked I believe, but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding. In America they use a lot of maize and they just soak that for weeks at a time, they never boil it.

A fish doesn’t have a very complicated digestive system, I saw a fish doctor say it’s like a long bag where what goes in the mouth effectively pushes out what’s at the other end of the stomach so nothing sits there for very long. Hence why you see your bait on the mat sometimes I guess.
"but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding."

I agree with that, you can see the starch oozing out of the split seeds, then after a few days, the smell of the active bait is obvious particularly if you add molasses but I catch enough bream anyway :laughs:

Cheers ALan
one reason for boiling is it stops dropped seeds germinating, it also turns starch into sugar, maple peas that have been left to soak and ferment a few days are much better than straight out the pan.
Some seeds may not have been soaked enough when the carp eats them---you may get problems.

Just soak them Al, really soak them, drain off then put in a large cool box and fill up with boiling water----next morning everything is just fine.
Some pigeon mixes only need covering in boiling water and don't need soaking, they are usually the conditioning ones and are full of small seeds.

Mick Cobb
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Re: Boiling bait...or not?

Post by Mick Cobb » Sun May 06 2018 22:20

cookiesdaughtersdad wrote:
Fish on.... wrote:
Some particles can be bad for the fish if not cooked I believe, but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding. In America they use a lot of maize and they just soak that for weeks at a time, they never boil it.

A fish doesn’t have a very complicated digestive system, I saw a fish doctor say it’s like a long bag where what goes in the mouth effectively pushes out what’s at the other end of the stomach so nothing sits there for very long. Hence why you see your bait on the mat sometimes I guess.
"but most cooking is done to bring the fermentation forward and make them more attractive in my understanding."

I agree with that, you can see the starch oozing out of the split seeds, then after a few days, the smell of the active bait is obvious particularly if you add molasses but I catch enough bream anyway :laughs:

Cheers ALan
One main reason to soak/boil some particles is to swell them so they dont expand if eaten. :thumbs:
Always quietly confident.

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