Cork

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Rosemary
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Cork

Post by Rosemary » Sat Apr 13 2019 11:21

I have a small Myford lathe and would like to turn some cork. So what is the best chuck speed and what would be the best cutting tool. Must admit that up to now my attempts have been miserable failures.
Just old and knackered.

Bucks Andy
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Re: Cork

Post by Bucks Andy » Sat Apr 13 2019 12:45

Rosemary.
You will be better off using emery paper. Start with a rough grade,this can remove a lot of material quickly and go through the different grades up to 1000 wet and dry to finish.

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Re: Cork

Post by Kev Berry » Sat Apr 13 2019 12:59

Rosemary wrote:
I have a small Myford lathe and would like to turn some cork. So what is the best chuck speed and what would be the best cutting tool. Must admit that up to now my attempts have been miserable failures.
best of luck with that Rosemary====watch this chap

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcfMmTpflVY

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Rosemary
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Re: Cork

Post by Rosemary » Sat Apr 13 2019 15:46

Thanks for replies. Kevin. The man in your clip clearly knows what he is doing, I don't. I am also experimenting with balsa wood to make fishing Gazette floats but I am only using a Stanley knife, Dreadnought file and sandpaper for that. I am very good at ruining bits of wood and stuff.
Just old and knackered.

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Re: Cork

Post by Nige Johns » Sat Apr 13 2019 16:15

Is there no end to your talents Rosemary ? :grin:

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Re: Cork

Post by delboy » Sat Apr 13 2019 18:17

Rosemary wrote:
Thanks for replies. Kevin. The man in your clip clearly knows what he is doing, I don't. I am also experimenting with balsa wood to make fishing Gazette floats but I am only using a Stanley knife, Dreadnought file and sandpaper for that. I am very good at ruining bits of wood and stuff.
All part of the fun
Nothing wrong with me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1 Its everyone else.

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Re: Cork

Post by Kev Berry » Sun Apr 14 2019 09:28

Rosemary wrote:
Thanks for replies. Kevin. The man in your clip clearly knows what he is doing, I don't. I am also experimenting with balsa wood to make fishing Gazette floats but I am only using a Stanley knife, Dreadnought file and sandpaper for that. I am very good at ruining bits of wood and stuff.
I looked into making some pike floats. Was cheaper to buy them ready made ....the price of balsa :afraid:
Incidentally did you know balsa is classed as a hardwood?

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Re: Cork

Post by Rosemary » Sun Apr 14 2019 12:30

Nige Johns wrote:
Is there no end to your talents Rosemary ? :grin:
No there isn't but I'm telling no one about that.
Just old and knackered.

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Re: Cork

Post by Rosemary » Sun Apr 14 2019 12:38

Kev Berry wrote:
Rosemary wrote:
Thanks for replies. Kevin. The man in your clip clearly knows what he is doing, I don't. I am also experimenting with balsa wood to make fishing Gazette floats but I am only using a Stanley knife, Dreadnought file and sandpaper for that. I am very good at ruining bits of wood and stuff.
I looked into making some pike floats. Was cheaper to buy them ready made ....the price of balsa :afraid:
Incidentally did you know balsa is classed as a hardwood?
Mr Berry. Methinks that you are a tackle haggler, someone who sells tackle to the public.If that is so you are sure to say that its better to buy. I enjoy making floats and stuff even if they do sit a bit wonkey in the water.
Just old and knackered.

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Re: Cork

Post by Kev Berry » Sun Apr 14 2019 13:35

Rosemary wrote:
Kev Berry wrote:
Rosemary wrote:
Thanks for replies. Kevin. The man in your clip clearly knows what he is doing, I don't. I am also experimenting with balsa wood to make fishing Gazette floats but I am only using a Stanley knife, Dreadnought file and sandpaper for that. I am very good at ruining bits of wood and stuff.
I looked into making some pike floats. Was cheaper to buy them ready made ....the price of balsa :afraid:
Incidentally did you know balsa is classed as a hardwood?
Mr Berry. Methinks that you are a tackle haggler, someone who sells tackle to the public.If that is so you are sure to say that its better to buy. I enjoy making floats and stuff even if they do sit a bit wonkey in the water.
I am surrounded by floats in my shop......but I still prefer to make my own. Much to the amusement of some customers. Been knocking a load of quill floats up recently. Look up prices of balsa dowel. Not cheap.
Heres a hint if you making line through pike floats. Make them out of 4 square sections. Shave a corner off one long side then glue them together with a plastic/brass tube down the middle.

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Re: Cork

Post by Mike J » Sun Apr 14 2019 17:09

Rosie,
Please take great care when using that little Myford.
Myford lathes are not toys and if any loose clothing, hair or cuffs gets caught on the chuck or material it can wrap around in seconds!
Kev will bear me out, some of the injuries caused by entangling on lathes you would wish on your worst enemy.

To shape a revolving item.
Hold the file at each end, lay it on the cork 1/3 from the file tip and slowly push it forward to abrade the surface.
If using sandpaper cut it into short strips the width of a file and lay a stip on the file and repeat as above.
DO NOT use strips of emery cloth as it can wrap around the cork (or whatever) and snag your finger at rhe same time, with horrible consequences.

For float stems the cheapest, most simple and strongest material are round wooden (cane) bar-be-que skewers.
Cork from a quality bottle* is the best for floats, Champagne/Asti corks are what I use.

Tip;
Quality wine, as apposed to plonk, requires a quality cork to keep it airtight, pressing a wine cork together between you finger and thumb is a common way of testing a wines quality, if the cork is soft the wine is rubbish, if its rock hard it isn't, simples.

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Re: Cork

Post by Mattjb » Sun Apr 14 2019 20:00

I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price

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Re: Cork

Post by Kev Berry » Sun Apr 14 2019 23:20

Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price
25mm works out about £1 a 6 inch length---cheaper to buy them ready made if you want a big float for a decent lively and a 3/4 ounce weight for trotting
I had a big box of them I bought from a shop closure sale----gave loads away----sadly I only kept about half a dozen for myself (feckkin eejit I am :laughs: ) ---and the pike have munched 2 of them to kindling.

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Re: Cork

Post by Mike J » Mon Apr 15 2019 10:51

Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:

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Rosemary
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Re: Cork

Post by Rosemary » Mon Apr 15 2019 12:11

Mike J wrote:
Rosie,
Please take great care when using that little Myford.
Myford lathes are not toys and if any loose clothing, hair or cuffs gets caught on the chuck or material it can wrap around in seconds!
Kev will bear me out, some of the injuries caused by entangling on lathes you would wish on your worst enemy.

To shape a revolving item.
Hold the file at each end, lay it on the cork 1/3 from the file tip and slowly push it forward to abrade the surface.
If using sandpaper cut it into short strips the width of a file and lay a stip on the file and repeat as above.
DO NOT use strips of emery cloth as it can wrap around the cork (or whatever) and snag your finger at rhe same time, with horrible consequences.

For float stems the cheapest, most simple and strongest material are round wooden (cane) bar-be-que skewers.
Cork from a quality bottle* is the best for floats, Champagne/Asti corks are what I use.

Tip;
Quality wine, as apposed to plonk, requires a quality cork to keep it airtight, pressing a wine cork together between you finger and thumb is a common way of testing a wines quality, if the cork is soft the wine is rubbish, if its rock hard it isn't, simples.
Mike. I have been using a variety of machine tool in my husbands business for thirty years, up to now no injuries. The Myford is in my shed with a few other tools. I have posted TOOLS EXPLAINED on another thread.
Just old and knackered.

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Re: Cork

Post by Kev Berry » Mon Apr 15 2019 12:21

Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
when you sanded to required shape just apply a bit of pressure with some brown paper---it slightly melts the surface giving it a hard shell :wink:

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Re: Cork

Post by Mattjb » Mon Apr 15 2019 13:29

Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
Cheers Mike, I can get plenty of foam but the cream coloured celotex rather than blue. I work on building sites so there's always offcuts of the stuff laying about.I know the quills don't have to be wrapped but I do just for the job satisfaction side of things!

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Re: Cork

Post by Mike J » Tue Apr 16 2019 16:18

Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
Cheers Mike, I can get plenty of foam but the cream coloured celotex rather than blue. I work on building sites so there's always offcuts of the stuff laying about.I know the quills don't have to be wrapped but I do just for the job satisfaction side of things!

HA ha, yes I use the cream stuff as well.
I only mentioned the blue as its easier to find than the cream stuff.

What quills do you use?

Ive been playing with the idea of glueing the thick end of two swan or goose quills into each other and using it as a body for small laying-on floats. I find laying-on in a backeddy very effective for shy biting fish but the method requires a specialist float with just enough body to stop it being pulled under by the back currents but not so much as to cause a drag and alert the fish.

:thumbs:

Mattjb
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Re: Cork

Post by Mattjb » Tue Apr 16 2019 20:22

Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
Cheers Mike, I can get plenty of foam but the cream coloured celotex rather than blue. I work on building sites so there's always offcuts of the stuff laying about.I know the quills don't have to be wrapped but I do just for the job satisfaction side of things!

HA ha, yes I use the cream stuff as well.
I only mentioned the blue as its easier to find than the cream stuff.

What quills do you use?

Ive been playing with the idea of glueing the thick end of two swan or goose quills into each other and using it as a body for small laying-on floats. I find laying-on in a backeddy very effective for shy biting fish but the method requires a specialist float with just enough body to stop it being pulled under by the back currents but not so much as to cause a drag and alert the fish.

:thumbs:
I use whatever quills I can find,mainly gull but I keep ducks so kept some duck quills when they last moulted.The duck quills are a bit short but more robust than the gull quills.
I tried the balsa for bodies the other evening, soon realised it's difficult to drill as its so soft the bit wanders! In the end I sharpened a piece of fibreglass kite rod and just pushed it through.
Found the balsa much easier to shape and taper than the cork.
If you join the traditional fishing forum which is a bit of a faff to register on ,the float making forum has a lot of info ,pics on but be warned your own efforts will look decided rough after viewing the quality work on there!

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Re: Cork

Post by Mike J » Tue Apr 16 2019 21:14

Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
Cheers Mike, I can get plenty of foam but the cream coloured celotex rather than blue. I work on building sites so there's always offcuts of the stuff laying about.I know the quills don't have to be wrapped but I do just for the job satisfaction side of things!

HA ha, yes I use the cream stuff as well.
I only mentioned the blue as its easier to find than the cream stuff.

What quills do you use?

Ive been playing with the idea of glueing the thick end of two swan or goose quills into each other and using it as a body for small laying-on floats. I find laying-on in a backeddy very effective for shy biting fish but the method requires a specialist float with just enough body to stop it being pulled under by the back currents but not so much as to cause a drag and alert the fish.

:thumbs:
I use whatever quills I can find,mainly gull but I keep ducks so kept some duck quills when they last moulted.The duck quills are a bit short but more robust than the gull quills.
I tried the balsa for bodies the other evening, soon realised it's difficult to drill as its so soft the bit wanders! In the end I sharpened a piece of fibreglass kite rod and just pushed it through.
Found the balsa much easier to shape and taper than the cork.
If you join the traditional fishing forum which is a bit of a faff to register on ,the float making forum has a lot of info ,pics on but be warned your own efforts will look decided rough after viewing the quality work on there!



Ive used kite rods, the carbon ones are really good for float stems.

Trad Forum has a few decent members but the guy that owns it is an oppressive autocrat, if you post anything he dislikes you get a black mark against your name, two and your banned.

Mattjb
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Re: Cork

Post by Mattjb » Tue Apr 16 2019 21:28

Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
Mike J wrote:
Mattjb wrote:
I've turned some small cork float bodies on a dremel the only problem I find is you can't get it to a taper without it crumbling but that might be down to using rubbishy cork as Mike says! Got some 15mm balsa to try next time. 4 quid posted for 4 300mm lengths on eBay , didn't think that was a bad price


Hi Matt,
Try the blue insulation foam used by builders in cavity walls, its fine grained and cheap enough to learn what works for you if your a scrounger or bin dive.

To use the foam I rough trim, drill the hole, mount on a knitting needle and shape using a sharp knife and emery board/sand paper, then glue onto the quill and finish.
I use super glue to hold everything together which also strengthens the foam rock hard (you can step on it).
I paint the tip with Goth nail varnish over Dulux One-Coat Undercoat, everything else is untouched.
I never straighten the quill as (I think) the natural bend assists presentation and no bottom eye, and never wrap the quill stem as it wasn't done years ago so why now?
I only use floats that will carry 4 - 8gms or 2.5 - 5 SSG which makes foam ideal as its 1/3 more bouyant than cork in volume.

:thumbs:
Cheers Mike, I can get plenty of foam but the cream coloured celotex rather than blue. I work on building sites so there's always offcuts of the stuff laying about.I know the quills don't have to be wrapped but I do just for the job satisfaction side of things!

HA ha, yes I use the cream stuff as well.
I only mentioned the blue as its easier to find than the cream stuff.

What quills do you use?

Ive been playing with the idea of glueing the thick end of two swan or goose quills into each other and using it as a body for small laying-on floats. I find laying-on in a backeddy very effective for shy biting fish but the method requires a specialist float with just enough body to stop it being pulled under by the back currents but not so much as to cause a drag and alert the fish.

:thumbs:
I use whatever quills I can find,mainly gull but I keep ducks so kept some duck quills when they last moulted.The duck quills are a bit short but more robust than the gull quills.
I tried the balsa for bodies the other evening, soon realised it's difficult to drill as its so soft the bit wanders! In the end I sharpened a piece of fibreglass kite rod and just pushed it through.
Found the balsa much easier to shape and taper than the cork.
If you join the traditional fishing forum which is a bit of a faff to register on ,the float making forum has a lot of info ,pics on but be warned your own efforts will look decided rough after viewing the quality work on there!



Ive used kite rods, the carbon ones are really good for float stems.

Trad Forum has a few decent members but the guy that owns it is an oppressive autocrat, if you post anything he dislikes you get a black mark against your name, two and your banned.
To be honest I haven't posted much on there , use it more for info/interest.
Kite rods are very handy for making things, I've used some for the inserts some big poly floats I made into self cockers for boat fishing stillwaters. My daughter had 2 kites but now she's only got one , well you can only fly one at a time anyway!

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