Float paints and lacquer

Whatever you create or fettle in your respective Man Cave you can discuss here
Forum rules
This section of the forum is for sensible people to discuss ideas and display things they've designed, created or fixed, it is not for people to talk about filth, religion or politics!
User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Tue Jan 03 2017 12:05

Does anybody here make their own floats? I've been doing this recently.

I have been collecting a variety of material for making my own pike floats...polystyrene, champagne corks from the pub, etc. I've also made some floats for when I'm going after silver fish...I made them from reeds.

I've got a little bit of modelling paint, and it looks good when used. I would like to cover them with lacquer...I've got some acrylic lacquer designed for use on cars. Will this melt the paint at all, or cause it to change somewhat? I have been told that some lacquer do this.

Thank you

Steve

User avatar
Crackoff
Brigadier
Brigadier
Posts: 6494
Joined: Sat Aug 27 2011 05:00
Location: Lancs

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Crackoff » Tue Jan 03 2017 12:22

ThePikingEcologist wrote:
Does anybody here make their own floats? I've been doing this recently.

I have been collecting a variety of material for making my own pike floats...polystyrene, champagne corks from the pub, etc. I've also made some floats for when I'm going after silver fish...I made them from reeds.

I've got a little bit of modelling paint, and it looks good when used. I would like to cover them with lacquer...I've got some acrylic lacquer designed for use on cars. Will this melt the paint at all, or cause it to change somewhat? I have been told that some lacquer do this.

Thank you

Steve
Don't know about the reeds Steve but some paint will melt the polystyrene :red: :laughs:

Grant :santa:
Grant Everson

You have to-be able to laugh at yourself before you can laugh at someone els ;-)

It’s easy to find fault. That's why theirs so many critics

I know a lot about a bit of stuff and a bit about a lot of stuff

User avatar
davelumb
Forum Sponsor
Forum Sponsor
Posts: 20180
Joined: Sat Aug 27 2011 05:00
Location: On some faraway beach
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by davelumb » Tue Jan 03 2017 12:50

Acrylic should be okay. Should...

User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Tue Jan 03 2017 13:37

Thanks Grant, I've just made a pike float out of polystyrene, I painted top half bright orange and bottom half matt black...it worked well...no melting that I could see.

Also, thanks Dave. I have sprayed this lacquer on floats made with reeds and cotton, it works but does darken the colours. I will try spraying it on the painted polystyrene..more for added protection than anything. Lets see how it turns out.

I was going to use one half of a kinder 'egg' to add a top on cork, but they've change the design into something unusable. :cry:

The idea is that the floats are as financially free as possible, so far I've invested in a few quit on paint...that's it. Time is money, so I'm working out how to churn them out quicker.

Next I am going to try drop back indicators.

User avatar
Andrew Croft
Bailiff
Bailiff
Posts: 11558
Joined: Wed Nov 02 2011 05:00
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Andrew Croft » Tue Jan 03 2017 14:59

Crackoff wrote:
ThePikingEcologist wrote:
Does anybody here make their own floats? I've been doing this recently.

I have been collecting a variety of material for making my own pike floats...polystyrene, champagne corks from the pub, etc. I've also made some floats for when I'm going after silver fish...I made them from reeds.

I've got a little bit of modelling paint, and it looks good when used. I would like to cover them with lacquer...I've got some acrylic lacquer designed for use on cars. Will this melt the paint at all, or cause it to change somewhat? I have been told that some lacquer do this.

Thank you

Steve
Don't know about the reeds Steve but some paint will melt the polystyrene :red: :laughs:

Grant :santa:
So does wood stain :red: (polystyrene cup oops)
Let me ask you one question. Is your money that good. Will it buy you forgiveness. Do you think that it could. I think you will find When your death takes its toll All the money you made Will never buy back your soul.

User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Tue Jan 03 2017 15:55

Thanks...

well...I tried the acrylic lacquer, and it blistered the paint. I am using enamel paint, and just wanted to add the lacquer as a bit more protection. I suppose the enamel paint on it own would ok though.

Has anyone got any ideas what would be a suitable lacquer to use?

Steve

Nige Johns
Major
Major
Posts: 1311
Joined: Thu Jul 16 2015 21:20
Location: Bury

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Nige Johns » Tue Jan 03 2017 17:51

What about clear nail varnish or the lacquer you get with car touch-up ? :shrug:

User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Tue Jan 03 2017 18:09

I used car lacquer mate...it seems as though lacquer and enamel paint do not go well together, the lacquer solvents ruin the paint. Not sure about nail varnish......

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Tue Jan 03 2017 18:50

I make or modify ALL all my own pike floats as I have never been able to find any in the shops that I like.

Inline balls, 40mm polyballs from Hobbycraft

Unloaded Pencils, balsa

Unloaded Wedge pencils , balsa

Inline's turned from blue foam, or refinished sea floats

Drifters are polyeggs from hobby craft with ET or Fox stems.

I use Jaime's lathe for turning the shapes, but you can do it with a drill and sandpaper.

Whatever the material, a thin coat of epoxy before painting means you can use any paint you like without worrying about reaction, and you have a nice flat surface to paint, which will make the colour brighter. The extra coat of epoxy does tend to toughen them up a bit.

I now use enamel spray paints, as the build of colour is quicker and I don't need to flatten between coats.

Trim tape from model shop gives a nice white line (if that's your thing) and saves farting about with masking tape.

I purchased a fly dryer for £15, which means the epoxy finishes in a smooth even surface.

Single coat of epoxy after painting and they last ages.
20161202_190601.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

User avatar
Andrew Croft
Bailiff
Bailiff
Posts: 11558
Joined: Wed Nov 02 2011 05:00
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Andrew Croft » Tue Jan 03 2017 19:15

ThePikingEcologist wrote:
I used car lacquer mate...it seems as though lacquer and enamel paint do not go well together, the lacquer solvents ruin the paint. Not sure about nail varnish......
Nail varnish would be fine I guess :shrug: I use it for repairing floats that start taking on water, its not that corrosive/melting/whatever(the word escapes me) like superglue can be. worth a try.
Let me ask you one question. Is your money that good. Will it buy you forgiveness. Do you think that it could. I think you will find When your death takes its toll All the money you made Will never buy back your soul.

Barryfisher
Captain
Captain
Posts: 691
Joined: Mon Nov 07 2016 18:49
Location: Stoke on Trent

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Barryfisher » Tue Jan 03 2017 20:52

Can I ask what epoxy you use Duncan? Thanks :grin:
An expert is but a beginner with experience.
"Sometimes in life there is a great skill in knowing when to shut up" - Alan.

User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Tue Jan 03 2017 21:10

Duncan...absolutely superb information, thanks very much. Your floats look very good as well.

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Tue Jan 03 2017 21:43

Barryfisher wrote:
Can I ask what epoxy you use Duncan? Thanks :grin:
Zap 30 min, I give it a few seconds blast in the microwave to warm it up before mixing, then use 5ml syringes to measure it out accurately.

http://modelshopleeds.co.uk/catalog/pro ... 0wodmV8Hcg

Once coated on the float and turning on the dryer, I apply some heat from a hairdryer to "pop" any air bubbles.
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

Barryfisher
Captain
Captain
Posts: 691
Joined: Mon Nov 07 2016 18:49
Location: Stoke on Trent

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Barryfisher » Wed Jan 04 2017 00:17

Thanks Duncan. Much appreciated :thumbs: :thumbs: :thumbs:

If I can't get it from our local hobby shop I'll send for some from there.
An expert is but a beginner with experience.
"Sometimes in life there is a great skill in knowing when to shut up" - Alan.

Barryfisher
Captain
Captain
Posts: 691
Joined: Mon Nov 07 2016 18:49
Location: Stoke on Trent

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Barryfisher » Fri Jan 13 2017 02:15

Hi Duncan
I managed to get the 30 min Zap epoxy locally from Emodels for their on line price of £13.19.

I assume you're brushing it on? What do you clean the brush with after use, denatured alcohol or some other solvent such as acetone etc?
Cheers Barry
An expert is but a beginner with experience.
"Sometimes in life there is a great skill in knowing when to shut up" - Alan.

User avatar
Steve Dennington
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3059
Joined: Mon Aug 29 2011 05:00
Location: Suffolk

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Steve Dennington » Wed Feb 01 2017 20:12

Barryfisher wrote:
What do you clean the brush with after use, denatured alcohol or some other solvent such as acetone etc?
It's much easier to use flux brushes and bin them after use.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FLUX-BRUSHES- ... SwxH1UDYOr

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Wed Feb 01 2017 23:26

Barryfisher wrote:
Hi Duncan
I managed to get the 30 min Zap epoxy locally from Emodels for their on line price of £13.19.

I assume you're brushing it on? What do you clean the brush with after use, denatured alcohol or some other solvent such as acetone etc?
Cheers Barry
Isopropyl Alcohol is what you need Barry, don't be tempted to "thin" the epoxy with it, although it works it can make the epoxy porous.

As Steve says you can use cheap brushes and chuck them, I did for that for years.
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

Barryfisher
Captain
Captain
Posts: 691
Joined: Mon Nov 07 2016 18:49
Location: Stoke on Trent

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Barryfisher » Wed Feb 01 2017 23:32

Thanks guys :thumbs:

Duncan, I'm sure I've got some isopropanol but if not I can soon get some from the lab :laughs:
An expert is but a beginner with experience.
"Sometimes in life there is a great skill in knowing when to shut up" - Alan.

User avatar
davelumb
Forum Sponsor
Forum Sponsor
Posts: 20180
Joined: Sat Aug 27 2011 05:00
Location: On some faraway beach
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by davelumb » Thu Feb 02 2017 09:17

Duncan Holmes wrote:
Isopropyl Alcohol is what you need Barry, don't be tempted to "thin" the epoxy with it, although it works it can make the epoxy porous.

As Steve says you can use cheap brushes and chuck them, I did for that for years.
You can thin the epoxies used to varnish rods with acetone and it cleans brushes.

Disposable brushes are a lot less hassle though.

Barryfisher
Captain
Captain
Posts: 691
Joined: Mon Nov 07 2016 18:49
Location: Stoke on Trent

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Barryfisher » Thu Feb 02 2017 13:18

Thanks Dave :thumbs:
An expert is but a beginner with experience.
"Sometimes in life there is a great skill in knowing when to shut up" - Alan.

User avatar
Crackoff
Brigadier
Brigadier
Posts: 6494
Joined: Sat Aug 27 2011 05:00
Location: Lancs

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Crackoff » Sat Feb 04 2017 11:23

Picked up a few tips hear cheers lads :thumbs:

Grant :smile:
Grant Everson

You have to-be able to laugh at yourself before you can laugh at someone els ;-)

It’s easy to find fault. That's why theirs so many critics

I know a lot about a bit of stuff and a bit about a lot of stuff

Mike J
Major
Major
Posts: 1679
Joined: Wed Nov 09 2016 09:26
Location: Wessex

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Mike J » Sun Feb 12 2017 10:53

Easily the cheapest pike floats are those made from the stems of reed mace aka bull rushes.
I only use the stems with the seed heads, cut in the Autumn before the swans start eating them.
Just peel off the outer layer and leave everything including the seed heads on the bank.
Next I store them in my shed for a year before cutting into 6-8" lengths to lay them ontop of a radiator for a week.
Trim to size, smooth off and a single coat of warmed yacht varnish and thats it.
Prepped as above I have carried them throughout a season in my bag without any detriment to the buoyancy.

To use; attach them top and bottom using a couple of small 1" rubber bands doubled over, this enables quick changes and for it to be easily detached if the fish swims through a snag or weeds.
Reed stems are very buoyant, a 6" x 1/2" dia length will easily support a bait of 4/5" plus weights.
Best of all they are natural and blend in with the surroundings so cannot alarm fish or attract the attention of nosey anglers to how your fishing. If I paint them at all I use yellow touch up with a black felt tip cap.

Cheapest Drifter Stems
I use aluminium knitting needles, they weigh nothing, are nigh on indestructible and can be picked up in bundles for a few pence in charity shops.

For trotting floats
I use cormorant quills :wink: utterly waterproof and can be bent always without damage, bodies from blue insulation foam reinforced with yacht varnish, tips painted with girlie nail lacquer, dont paint the body - the skys blue!!

For a rotary dryer
Just salvage the table motor from a redundant microwave, they always work, just remember to leave the spade-end connectors on the wires.

:thumbs:

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Sun Feb 12 2017 12:38

Mike J wrote:
For a rotary dryer
Just salvage the table motor from a redundant microwave, they always work, just remember to leave the spade-end connectors on the wires.

:thumbs:
That's interesting Mike, could you post a picture of how you have rigged it up. :thumbs:
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

Mike J
Major
Major
Posts: 1679
Joined: Wed Nov 09 2016 09:26
Location: Wessex

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Mike J » Mon Feb 13 2017 11:26

Duncan Holmes wrote:
Mike J wrote:
For a rotary dryer
Just salvage the table motor from a redundant microwave, they always work, just remember to leave the spade-end connectors on the wires.

:thumbs:
That's interesting Mike, could you post a picture of how you have rigged it up. :thumbs:




Oh come on Duncan :roll:
The red wire is the live and the black wire is the negative (I think :scratch: )

An inline light switch is fitted between the motor and the plug socket and the motor is fitted to a stand using the two screw holes in the support bracket.
:thumbs:

I actually use microwave motors for rod drying as the rpm is perfect, but thats another subject altogether.

Re; Pics.
Im happy to provide a technical discription but as for posting pics, if I cant attach it directly (as some forums allow) Im certainly not going through all the rigmarol of using a third party who could use my links for anything they wish. Sorry.

User avatar
ThePikingEcologist
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 183
Joined: Thu Dec 01 2016 14:17

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by ThePikingEcologist » Mon Feb 13 2017 14:06

I use reed for making floats for roach, bream etc. It's a fabulous material. I don't do many of the steps as mentioned in the post above.

I select the reeds depending up on their thickness and the length of the sections between each growing node. This allows me to make floats that are very light and suitable for little roaches in the winter time, up to heavier floats if I ever go mad and decide to catch an ugly mirror carp.

I pick them at wintertime and peel off the outer layer. I might give them a little clean with a cloth if needed.

I then use a smaller reed, or else a piece of match stick and to that I whip on an eye made from copper wire. To whip it on I use cotton string. I then insert this into the bottom end of the reed, and glue it a little. Sometimes I will also whip the matchstick onto the bottom of the reed for added strength. I then paint the top with bright orange fluorescent paint. If I want to make a self-cocking float, I push some shot into the bottom of the reed ...this works perfectly. I also make insert waglers by inserting a match stick or a small piece of reed into the top end.

As I have improved I can make them reasonably quickly. But if you're a very busy man and money is time, you're probably better buying some nice Drennan waglers, which I have used my whole life.

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Mon Feb 13 2017 19:02

Mike J wrote:
Duncan Holmes wrote:
Mike J wrote:
For a rotary dryer
Just salvage the table motor from a redundant microwave, they always work, just remember to leave the spade-end connectors on the wires.

:thumbs:
That's interesting Mike, could you post a picture of how you have rigged it up. :thumbs:




Oh come on Duncan :roll:
The red wire is the live and the black wire is the negative (I think :scratch: )

An inline light switch is fitted between the motor and the plug socket and the motor is fitted to a stand using the two screw holes in the support bracket.
:thumbs:

I actually use microwave motors for rod drying as the rpm is perfect, but thats another subject altogether.

Re; Pics.
Im happy to provide a technical discription but as for posting pics, if I cant attach it directly (as some forums allow) Im certainly not going through all the rigmarol of using a third party who could use my links for anything they wish. Sorry.
Not really sure what the sarky comment is for? Genuine question. I actually looked at using a motor like this prior to buying a dryer and decided it was more than £15's worth of hassle and just brought a battery one.

It was the support bracket and junction with the rod/drying disc/etc I was most interested in, and whether or not the Motor was running from AC or DC supply.

If it is AC do you bother to run an earth?

Red and Black suggests to me its low voltage DC, as the colours for anywhere in Europe should be Brown/blue on 230VAC. But your suggestion in that its wired through an inline light switch suggests its AC. :scratch:

(PS its easy to upload direct, see the "upload attachment" box under the box in which you type)
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

Kev Berry
Forum Sponsor
Forum Sponsor
Posts: 16031
Joined: Sat Aug 27 2011 05:00
Location: Robin Hood country

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Kev Berry » Mon Feb 13 2017 22:04

Mike J wrote:
I use cormorant quills :wink: utterly waterproof and can be bent always without damage, bodies from blue insulation foam reinforced with yacht varnish, tips painted with girlie nail lacquer, dont paint the body - the skys blue!!


:thumbs:
I presume you turning these in a drill/lathe on a stem? A tip I picked up many many years ago out of Angling times was after you had turned/sanded the body was to speed up the revs and burnish it with a strip of brown paper---it slightly melts the outside putting a tough skin on it

Pikemonkey
Sergeant
Sergeant
Posts: 239
Joined: Fri Dec 30 2011 06:00
Location: Essex

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Pikemonkey » Fri Feb 17 2017 19:03

What's wrong with good old exterior paint?
Always some lying around in the shed.
Won't last forever but good for a few years.

I made a batch of balsa floats 7 years ago. Used marine paint , single component. Still good.
fine stainless split pins cut down with a swivel threaded on the eye. Shove that in the end with some araldite.

Mike J
Major
Major
Posts: 1679
Joined: Wed Nov 09 2016 09:26
Location: Wessex

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Mike J » Mon Feb 20 2017 11:03

Sorry guys, I haven't been to the shed since my last post.

Okay Duncan, perhaps I was a bit harsh, certainly no offence was intended but as an engineer Im absolutely hopeless with anything electrical, even when changing a plug I open another to copy how the wires go :pale:
All the micro motors Ive scavanged have had two wires only, none had an inline fuse and all I wired up as I posted, and being non electrical I tested all over with a meter when I powered it up, and before I touched it!
With most dead microwaves the 13amp fuse thats hidden deep inside is usually all thats gone..... :thumbs:
I have also used the D cell battery operated rotisserie gadget thats sold in B&Q for Bar-b- ques but rigging them up is a bit fiddly I found.
To rig a micro motor I used a metal book-end, screwing the motor to the outside of the vertical the spindle going thro a hole drilled thro the vertical, the base I screwed to a wooded board.
The short motor spindle which can be used to drive a rubber band to turn a drying plate, to which the items are fixed by stuffing the ends in a blob of blue tack.
If its just a few items the blue tack can be fixed to the spindle and the float stems stuffed into it.
For a rod dryer the blank is set-up on rollers and the tip/butt of the blank is turned by a rubber band.
For fly drying a stiff cardboard plate is b/tacked to the spindle and the flies just stabbed into the cardboard.
Oh all the micro motors are the same size, so one installation fits all, but they never wear out, or mine don't!

Kev,
Ah yes working the foam.
I roughly shape it with a knife, then drill the hole and mount it on a spindle (metal sock needle) then shave it with a v sharp blade, then I use sandpaper to get the final shape, finally mounting it on the quill and soaking it with superglue to make it all solid (almost crushproof).
I once had a brainwave :yahoo: to make float bodies by squirting expanding foam into a beachbomb mould, omg, it needed a knife to open the mould which wrecked the whole idea :lol:


Pike Eco.
What reeds are you using?
Yes my method is a bit lengthy but they are for pike and I want them really dry and buoyant.


Note to self, visit shed more often.

User avatar
Duncan Holmes
Colonel
Colonel
Posts: 3341
Joined: Mon Feb 20 2012 06:00
Location: In the heart of Norfolk
Contact:

Re: Float paints and lacquer

Post by Duncan Holmes » Mon Feb 20 2017 21:15

Thanks Mike :thumbs:
"The opinions expressed in any of my posts are my own and do not reflect the view of the any organisation that I may be associated with."

Post Reply