Kimchi - anyone eat or make their own?

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Mike J
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Kimchi - anyone eat or make their own?

Post by Mike J »

From Wiki.
Kimchi, is a traditional Korean banchan consisting of salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly using napa cabbage or Korean radish. A wide selection of seasonings are used, including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

My regular Chinese is attracting a growing number of Korean customers, this has led to the chefs trialing a Kimchi dim sum which I have eaten a couple of times. At first I thought the filling was a type of coarse sausage meat but have now discovered it was a pickle of various vegetables, soy, fish sauce and salted shrimps. Whatever they were absolutely delicious, not overly hot (chilli) but certainly nicely spiced, crunchy and really nothing not to like.

In Korea Kimchi is used as a side dish in a similar way to Harissa with Moroccan food.

Whatever, to buy Kimchi in this country is expensive £2.50/200gm pack, so having many of the ingrediants in my store I now plan to make my own, hence this post, just in case someone out in PP land makes it already and can share some tips.
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Re: Kimchi - anyone eat or make their own?

Post by keeponchucking »

Mike J wrote: Sat Oct 14 2023 10:44 -
From Wiki.
Kimchi, is a traditional Korean banchan consisting of salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly using napa cabbage or Korean radish. A wide selection of seasonings are used, including gochugaru, spring onions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal, etc.

My regular Chinese is attracting a growing number of Korean customers, this has led to the chefs trialing a Kimchi dim sum which I have eaten a couple of times. At first I thought the filling was a type of coarse sausage meat but have now discovered it was a pickle of various vegetables, soy, fish sauce and salted shrimps. Whatever they were absolutely delicious, not overly hot (chilli) but certainly nicely spiced, crunchy and really nothing not to like.

In Korea Kimchi is used as a side dish in a similar way to Harissa with Moroccan food.

Whatever, to buy Kimchi in this country is expensive £2.50/200gm pack, so having many of the ingrediants in my store I now plan to make my own, hence this post, just in case someone out in PP land makes it already and can share some tips.

AA230142-81D9-4C46-8240-7F2968DC7849.jpeg
I love it Mike and I eat it a good bit. I haven't made my own yet Usually have it as a side, kimchi fried rice or on a wrap with some other bits.

There is an Asian store close to where I work in Dublin that sells one they make but also sell one below i picked up recently which is quite nice.
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Re: Kimchi - anyone eat or make their own?

Post by Ben »

I eat it but couldn’t be arsed making my own.

Love Sauerkraut too, goes great with many dishes, particularly Ruben sandwiches plus Sausage & Mash.
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Re: Kimchi - anyone eat or make their own?

Post by Mike J »

Ben wrote: Thu Nov 02 2023 20:28 -
I eat it but couldn’t be arsed making my own.

Love Sauerkraut too, goes great with many dishes, particularly Ruben sandwiches plus Sausage & Mash.

One advantage of making your own is you can add extra daikon radish to give it more crunch and coip the cabbage up smaller to allow it mix easier, with say fried rice or noodles.

Sauerkraut you can can have my share anytime.

.
'No Man Ever Fishes The Same River Twice, .... For It Is Not The Same River, .... And He Is Not The Same Man' Heraclitus of Ephesus
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