Getting back in the boat

For all anglers who like to go afloat to catch their fish
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Danoutdoors
Jack Pike
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Getting back in the boat

Post by Danoutdoors » Thu Oct 10 2019 17:43

Just curious if on your own and possibly at anchor if you were to fall in how can you get back in the boat, have you got to swim for shaw? I imagine even with steps climbing out would be super hard and even with someone else on board getting back in would be very difficult, any thoughts? Thanks

Daniel
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Daniel » Thu Oct 10 2019 18:19

Assuming your outboards not running, stand on the outboards cavitation plate and push yourself up and clamber in as best you can.

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andrew_nagel
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by andrew_nagel » Thu Oct 10 2019 18:26

It's worth trying in full gear in the warmer months. The emergency services do training sessions with clubs over here, to show you how to go on. A swim-ladder or a toe step mounted on the transom is a good idea.

BillCollins
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by BillCollins » Thu Oct 10 2019 18:49

I fell out of my boat at night in full rain gear and no way could I climb back in. Luckily I was anchored about 40yds from the bank so I swam in, stripped off and swam back out and climbed in. Then had to collect my clothes from the bank and row back to the car. It was in summer and the water was warm, I don't think things would have been as simple in winter.

keeponchucking
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by keeponchucking » Thu Oct 10 2019 19:34

BillCollins wrote: ↑
I fell out of my boat at night in full rain gear and no way could I climb back in. Luckily I was anchored about 40yds from the bank so I swam in, stripped off and swam back out and climbed in. Then had to collect my clothes from the bank and row back to the car. It was in summer and the water was warm, I don't think things would have been as simple in winter.
scary stuff

BillCollins
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by BillCollins » Thu Oct 10 2019 20:14

keeponchucking wrote: ↑
BillCollins wrote: ↑
I fell out of my boat at night in full rain gear and no way could I climb back in. Luckily I was anchored about 40yds from the bank so I swam in, stripped off and swam back out and climbed in. Then had to collect my clothes from the bank and row back to the car. It was in summer and the water was warm, I don't think things would have been as simple in winter.
scary stuff
Not really. I had a spare set of clothing in the car, got changed and rowed back to my spot and carried on fishing. Amazingly, the fish (bream) were still there and feeding in spite of the commotion.
However, as previously mentioned, winter would have seen a completely different scenario...

Danoutdoors
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Danoutdoors » Sat Oct 12 2019 22:44

Thanks for the replies, more clued up than before, appreciate it πŸ‘

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Mike J
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Mike J » Sun Oct 13 2019 09:04

I used to regularly fish alone +30nm from shore for marlin, sharks and tunas and my boat was rigged accordingly.
I made a Stainless swim ladder* bolted to the top and back of the transom, it went down to water level, was hinged at the bottom, the same length extended upwards. A simple break-out release was attached to drop the extension.

If you fall in the water with the engine running the boat WILL start circling and get you in the end, this is why no feedback steering is absolutely essential if you fish alone.

* 18mm stainless tube formed on a basic plumbers pipe bender, MIG welded joints, hardwood treads.

Derek Kelly
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Derek Kelly » Mon Oct 14 2019 21:12

https://www.osculati.com/en/11629-m-003 ... ncy-ladder
Have one of these, hopefully never need to use it.
Spare set of clothes on board in a dry bag, with survival blanket.
Knife at both anchor lines incase having to cut free to save time to motor back to shore.
Spare set of clothes and survival blanket back at van.
Spare stove in van with army ration pack boil in bag meals.

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John Milford
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by John Milford » Mon Oct 14 2019 21:42

How you would get out of the drink is something to think about in advance if you're bank fishing too, when fishing steeply banked rivers and drains.

Not fishing alone is not the answer as you could both wind up in trouble without forward planning, especially in wet, muddy winter conditions.

How many would routinely carry and use a rope and stake I wonder?
"He's some sort of lure savant. Or just has an unhealthy addiction to old lures. We are not quite sure . . . . . "

Kev Berry
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Kev Berry » Sat Oct 19 2019 19:08

John Milford wrote: ↑
How you would get out of the drink is something to think about in advance if you're bank fishing too, when fishing steeply banked rivers and drains.

Not fishing alone is not the answer as you could both wind up in trouble without forward planning, especially in wet, muddy winter conditions.

How many would routinely carry and use a rope and stake I wonder?
I have a rope and dog lead screw always in my car Mike

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John Milford
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by John Milford » Sat Oct 19 2019 21:15

Using a screw-in dog lead spike is a great idea Kev. :thumbs:

(Who's Mike? :scratch: :clown: ).
"He's some sort of lure savant. Or just has an unhealthy addiction to old lures. We are not quite sure . . . . . "

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DaveGreenwood
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by DaveGreenwood » Sat Oct 19 2019 22:19

Something like this would be worth getting.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BOAT-ROPE-BO ... SwYeRaGCdM

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Crackoff
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Crackoff » Mon Oct 21 2019 21:20

Kev Berry wrote: ↑
John Milford wrote: ↑
How you would get out of the drink is something to think about in advance if you're bank fishing too, when fishing steeply banked rivers and drains.

Not fishing alone is not the answer as you could both wind up in trouble without forward planning, especially in wet, muddy winter conditions.

How many would routinely carry and use a rope and stake I wonder?
I have a rope and dog lead screw always in my car Mike
No flipping good in the car if your on the bank fishing is it MR :rasp: :laughs: :tongues:

Grant :exit:
Grant Everson

What people say there going todo and what they actually do is two completely different things :wink:

I know a lot about a bit of stuff and a bit about a lot of stuff :wink:

I upset some guys because I tell it as it is :wink:

Kev Berry
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Kev Berry » Mon Oct 21 2019 21:23

Crackoff wrote: ↑
Kev Berry wrote: ↑
John Milford wrote: ↑
How you would get out of the drink is something to think about in advance if you're bank fishing too, when fishing steeply banked rivers and drains.

Not fishing alone is not the answer as you could both wind up in trouble without forward planning, especially in wet, muddy winter conditions.

How many would routinely carry and use a rope and stake I wonder?
I have a rope and dog lead screw always in my car Mike
No flipping good in the car if your on the bank fishing is it MR :rasp: :laughs: :tongues:

Grant :exit:
ah, but its there for when I know I am going to fish steep or slippy pegs innit---did you not see it on the top of my peg on the PP bash (or were you too busy chatting up the ladies and strange men on bikes?)

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Crackoff
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Crackoff » Sat Oct 26 2019 01:02

Mike J wrote: ↑
I used to regularly fish alone +30nm from shore for marlin, sharks and tunas and my boat was rigged accordingly.
I made a Stainless swim ladder* bolted to the top and back of the transom, it went down to water level, was hinged at the bottom, the same length extended upwards. A simple break-out release was attached to drop the extension.

If you fall in the water with the engine running the boat WILL start circling and get you in the end, this is why no feedback steering is absolutely essential if you fish alone.

* 18mm stainless tube formed on a basic plumbers pipe bender, MIG welded joints, hardwood treads.
Mike do not have a kill cord attached to you so it kills the engine if you fall in :scratch:

Grant :smile:
Grant Everson

What people say there going todo and what they actually do is two completely different things :wink:

I know a lot about a bit of stuff and a bit about a lot of stuff :wink:

I upset some guys because I tell it as it is :wink:

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Mike J
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Mike J » Sat Oct 26 2019 12:09

Crackoff wrote: ↑
Mike J wrote: ↑
I used to regularly fish alone +30nm from shore for marlin, sharks and tunas and my boat was rigged accordingly.
I made a Stainless swim ladder* bolted to the top and back of the transom, it went down to water level, was hinged at the bottom, the same length extended upwards. A simple break-out release was attached to drop the extension.

If you fall in the water with the engine running the boat WILL start circling and get you in the end, this is why no feedback steering is absolutely essential if you fish alone.

* 18mm stainless tube formed on a basic plumbers pipe bender, MIG welded joints, hardwood treads.
Mike do not have a kill cord attached to you so it kills the engine if you fall in :scratch:

Grant :smile:

No never, and I only wore a lifejacket when attending an SOS from a dismasted yacht.
Mine was a 23ft CC walkaround with the coverboard at hip hight but thats not an excuse. My family were all Royal Navy and like them I believe in fate, so if the sea wants you there is nothing you can do stop it taking you.

My most dangerous (nay stupid) moment was washing tuna blood off my hands and while I was doing it looking across the water to see a couple of large fins only 20ft away.
My only two accidents were hooking myself on a double rig with a boated fish on the other hook, and fighting a big fish on heavy tackle without a butt pad and the rod butt parting my stomach muscles and penetrating 3" inside. The hook a removed myself, the stomach repair cost me +Β£3k in the UK.


Ke sera sera :cool:




RYA Yachtmaster.

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Crackoff
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Crackoff » Sat Oct 26 2019 12:26

Mike J wrote: ↑
Crackoff wrote: ↑
Mike J wrote: ↑
I used to regularly fish alone +30nm from shore for marlin, sharks and tunas and my boat was rigged accordingly.
I made a Stainless swim ladder* bolted to the top and back of the transom, it went down to water level, was hinged at the bottom, the same length extended upwards. A simple break-out release was attached to drop the extension.

If you fall in the water with the engine running the boat WILL start circling and get you in the end, this is why no feedback steering is absolutely essential if you fish alone.

* 18mm stainless tube formed on a basic plumbers pipe bender, MIG welded joints, hardwood treads.
Mike do not have a kill cord attached to you so it kills the engine if you fall in :scratch:

Grant :smile:

No never, and I only wore a lifejacket when attending an SOS from a dismasted yacht.
Mine was a 23ft CC walkaround with the coverboard at hip hight but thats not an excuse. My family were all Royal Navy and like them I believe in fate, so if the sea wants you there is nothing you can do stop it taking you.

My most dangerous (nay stupid) moment was washing tuna blood off my hands and while I was doing it looking across the water to see a couple of large fins only 20ft away.
My only two accidents were hooking myself on a double rig with a boated fish on the other hook, and fighting a big fish on heavy tackle without a butt pad and the rod butt parting my stomach muscles and penetrating 3" inside. The hook a removed myself, the stomach repair cost me +Β£3k in the UK.


Ke sera sera :cool:




RYA Yachtmaster.
Mmmmmmm to be fare hear Mike where talking small boats from 12ft to maybe 19ft so I think that we should encourage guys to have the kill cord attached to themselves espesherly when fishing on there own don't you :thumbs:

15C1E099-25D7-4F99-A606-71FB9CECAA74_1_105_c.jpeg


Grant :smile:
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Grant Everson

What people say there going todo and what they actually do is two completely different things :wink:

I know a lot about a bit of stuff and a bit about a lot of stuff :wink:

I upset some guys because I tell it as it is :wink:

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Mike J
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Re: Getting back in the boat

Post by Mike J » Sat Oct 26 2019 12:45

Couldn't agree more Grant, kill cord every time especially in small boats.

On any helmed boat I would always advise a self centreing steering system to eliminate all chances of the boat coming back and getting you if you do end up in the water and the engine doesn't die.

Just in case anyone doesn't understand - with basic steering and nobody on the tiller/helm a boat slowly turns into overlapping circles and eventually the prop blades hit anyone who is in the water, there is no escape, any person in the water always get hit with the prop (see Grants pic above, those are prop cuts).
With self centreing steering the boat continues on its set course.

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